Mons Graupius, 83 AD – Battle at the edge of the Roman world

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๐Ÿ“ข Narrated by David McCallion

๐ŸŽผ Music:
Epidemic Sounds
Filmstro
Impact Allegretto – Kevin MacLeod

๐Ÿ“š Sources:
Mons Graupius AD 83: Romeโ€™s Battle at the Edge of the World (2010), Cambell, Duncan, B. Osprey Publishing Ltd. ISBN: 978-1-84603-926-0.
Agricola & Germania (2009), Tacitus, Mattingly, H. (Translated). Penguin Classics. ISBN: 978-0-141-96154-5.
The Romans in Scotland and the Battle of Mons Graupius (2019), Forder, Simon. Amberley Publishing. ISBN: 9781445690551.

#history #rome #documentary

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8 Comments

  1. ๐Ÿšฉ Click https://betterhelp.com/historymarche for 10% off your first month of therapy with our sponsor BetterHelp.

    ๐Ÿšฉ Join over 4 million people whoโ€™ve met with a therapist on BetterHelp and started living a healthier, happier life.
    ๐Ÿšฉ Agricola is a fairly unknown figure, yet he was one of the most competent Roman commanders of his time, remembered for his decisive campaigns in Britain. Mons Graupius (AD 83/84) was his crowning achievement. The battle broke the army of the Caledonian Confederacy and it seemed that Rome was finally on the brink of conquering the whole of Britain…

    This was a very fun topic to research and piece together. Capable commanders winning victories in spite of the political intrigue, crisis, and turmoil disrupting their efforts. Roman empire brimming with power. Fun times.

  2. Re: Site of Battle of Mons Graupius. I am about to publish online my translation of the Pictish language (in about 8 weeks time) which graphemics proves, unquestionably, to be an isolating creole language (advanced pidgin) that uses the Old Irish lexicon as the lexifier. Included in this work is the translation of Bennachie, one of the contender sites of the battle, at the foot of which hill is a Roman fort. Bennachie supposedly means, in Gaelic, "Hill of the Breast" from the shape. However, the Gaelic word for "breast" is 'chiche', and not 'chie' as it's been written since the 14th. century. There is an Old Irish word, 'chฤซe', (ref: eDIL), the intransitive form of the verb 'ciid' meaning "cries, weeps, laments, lamenting." Benn na chie = Hill of Lamentation. This ties in perfectly with Tacitus' description of the battle in which he describes the Caledonian tribes weeping and lamenting. Co-incidence? I have also got startling new linguistic evidence for the Battle of Dunnichen plus a complete translation of the ogham inscriptions and wholesale revision of Pictish place-names, all in keeping with the Five Components of Language. The Pictish language is dated with reference to Tacitus to the 1st. century A.D. Get ready… History is about to be changed.

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